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Critchelow among seven fallen peace officers honored at the Ky. Law Enforcement Memorial Ceremony

In Local, News, State by OC Monitor Staff

RICHMOND, Ky. — Today, Gov. Andy Beshear honored seven Kentucky law enforcement officers who lost their lives in service to the Commonwealth in 2022. The Governor was joined by law enforcement families and representatives of the Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation.

“To become a peace officer is to make sacrifices and demonstrate courage and resilience that many of us only wish we were capable of, knowing that you may not come home at the end of your shift,” Gov. Beshear said. “The seven officers we lost last year knew this and still continued to serve in name of creating safer communities. They demonstrated courage until the very end, and for that, the entire Commonwealth of Kentucky is eternally grateful.”

The Governor said that Kentucky’s law enforcement memorial monument holds the names of 579 men and women heroes who have died in the line of duty since 1845 after adding today’s seven officers, and two historical individuals.

This year’s officer memorial ceremony honored:

London Police Officer Travis D. Hurley, end of watch Jan. 27, 2022. Officer Hurley died from complications of COVID-19 contracted from exposure while on duty.

Ohio County Deputy James “Jerry” Critchelow, end of watch April 20, 2022. Deputy Critchelow died five days after suffering a heart attack while directing traffic in front of Ohio County High School.

Calloway County Chief Deputy Jody W. Cash, end of watch May 16, 2022. Deputy Cash was shot and killed in front of the Marshall County Courthouse by a prisoner who was carrying a concealed gun.

Prestonsburg Police Capt. Ralph H. Frasure, end of watch June 30, 2022. Capt. Frasure was shot and killed in Allen, Ky., by a man who was wanted for domestic violence offenses.

Floyd County Deputy William E. Petry, end of watch June 30, 2022. Deputy Petry was shot and killed in Allen, Ky., by a man who was wanted for domestic violence offenses.

Prestonsburg Police Officer Jacob R. Chaffins, end of watch July 1, 2022. Officer Chaffins was shot and killed in Allen, Ky., by a man who was wanted for domestic violence offenses.

London Police Officer Logan K. Medlock, end of watch Oct. 30, 2022. Officer Medlock was killed when a drunk driver struck his patrol car.

The two historical honorees added to the monument this year are:

Harlan Police Officer Dixon A. Sasser, end of watch Oct. 13, 1918. Officer Sasser was shot and killed by a man who had just been released on bond for bootlegging.

Jefferson County Deputy Crockett M. Riddell, end of watch Jan. 13, 1933. Deputy Riddell was shot and killed while questioning four men who were loitering.

Former Georgetown Police Chief Mike Bosse also spoke during the ceremony Bosse was chief in 2021 when GPD lost Lieutenant Gary W. Crump to a fatal heart attack related to his investigative duties.

“Gary would want me to remind all of us who wear the uniform of the toll of doing this job,” Bosse said. “The stress, the trauma, the frustration. It takes a toll, and sometimes it is silent. Your profession is an honorable one. Honor born of the sacrifice and pain of ceremonies like this. May God bless you and keep you safe.”

KLEMF was established in 1999 to build a monument in recognition of Kentucky officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice. Once the monument was completed in 2000, the organization expanded its efforts to include an ongoing financial endowment program, which helps Kentucky peace officers and their families with educational, medical and emergency needs.

Special thank you to the following individuals for participating in today’s ceremony by paying tribute to the lives lost and committing to continuing to serve in their honor, Pikeville Police Department Honor Guard, Laurel County Sheriff’s Deputy James Grimes, Louisville Police Department Pipes and Drums, Maysville Police Major Chris Conley, Transylvania University Police Department. Officer Will Young, Department of Criminal Justice Training’s Eric Garner and Kentucky League of Cities Deputy Executive Director Doug Goforth.